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Topic “Africana studies”

Ojaideā€™s ā€˜Contemporary African Literatureā€™ published

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Tanure Ojaide, Frank Porter Graham Professor in the Department of Africana Studies, had the work “Contemporary African Literature: New Approaches” published by Carolina Academic Press.

Tanure Ojaide, Frank Porter Graham Professor in the Department of Africana Studies, had the work “Contemporary African Literature: New Approaches” published by Carolina Academic Press.

The book goes beyond conventional literary studies to open new vistas for critical excursion. It deals not only with purely literary issues of canonization, language, aesthetics and scholar-poet traditions but also with diverse interdisciplinary topics, such as migration, globalization, environmental and human rights and gender.

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book cover

Africana studies to hold 10th annual symposium

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The Department of Africana Studies will hold its 10th annual symposium on Thursday, April 26, in Cone University Center.

This year’s symposium is entitled “Looking Back – Moving Forward: Female Heroes, Freedom Riders and the Oval Office.” It will feature interdisciplinary presentations on civil rights and the struggle for democracy past to present.

The Department of Africana Studies will hold its 10th annual symposium on Thursday, April 26, in Cone University Center.

This year’s symposium is entitled “Looking Back – Moving Forward: Female Heroes, Freedom Riders and the Oval Office.” It will feature interdisciplinary presentations on civil rights and the struggle for democracy past to present.

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Africana studies part of Charlotte Africa Initiative

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UNC Charlotte’s Africana Studies Department is playing a critical role in the Charlotte Africa Initiative, which will officially launch with a series of workshops at UNC Charlotte Center City during Charlotte Africa Business Week, April 24-28.

“The Charlotte Africa Initiative allows businesses, students, scholars and others in the Charlotte region and elsewhere in North Carolina to engage with the emerging continent of Africa,” said Akin Ogundiran, chair of the Africana Studies Department in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences.

“These connections can be economic, cultural or academic,” Ogundiran said. “The goal is to improve and enrich the lives and livelihoods of communities in the United States and in Africa through business and entrepreneurial opportunities. We look forward to continuing to grow this initiative and welcome others to join with us.”

UNC Charlotte’s Africana Studies Department is playing a critical role in the Charlotte Africa Initiative, which will officially launch with a series of workshops at UNC Charlotte Center City during Charlotte Africa Business Week, April 24-28.

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Ogundiran

Renowned illustrator to serve as Africana Artist-in-Residence

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Nationally acclaimed illustrator and artist Barbara Higgins Bond will serve as UNC Charlotte’s 2012 Africana Artist-in-Residence.

Nationally acclaimed illustrator and artist Barbara Higgins Bond will serve as UNC Charlotte’s 2012 Africana Artist-in-Residence.

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higgins bond

Ojaide receives Cadbury Prize

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Tanure Ojaide, Frank Porter Graham Professor in the Department of Africana Studies, recently received the Cadbury Prize for Poetry awarded by the Association of Nigerian Authors for the book “The Beauty I Have Seen.”

Tanure Ojaide, Frank Porter Graham Professor in the Department of Africana Studies, recently received the Cadbury Prize for Poetry awarded by the Association of Nigerian Authors for the book “The Beauty I Have Seen.”

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ojaide

Ogundiran publishes journal article

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Akin Ogundiran, Africana studies, co-authored the article “Potters’ Marks and Social Relations of Ceramic Distribution in the Oyo Empire” that was published in a special edition of Azania: Journal of Archaeological Research in Africa.

Akin Ogundiran, Africana studies, co-authored the article “Potters’ Marks and Social Relations of Ceramic Distribution in the Oyo Empire” that was published in a special edition of Azania: Journal of Archaeological Research in Africa (vol.

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Visiting researcher to talk Ethiopian agriculture, herding

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Lee Broderick, a visiting researcher in the Africana Studies Department, will present “What Can Modern Day Agro-Pastoralist Practices in Ethiopia Tell Us About Past Lifestyles – There and Elsewhere?” at 11 a.m., Friday, Oct. 14, in the Fretwell Building, Room 419.

Lee Broderick, a visiting researcher in the Africana Studies Department, will present “What Can Modern Day Agro-Pastoralist Practices in Ethiopia Tell Us About Past Lifestyles – There and Elsewhere?” at 11 a.m., Friday, Oct. 14, in the Fretwell Building, Room 419.

Asheville mayor to give third Maxwell-Roddey lecture

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Terry Bellamy, mayor of Asheville and UNC Charlotte alumna, will deliver the third annual Bertha Maxwell-Roddey Distinguished Africana Lecture at 4:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 30, in the Rowe Arts Building, Room 130.

Terry Bellamy, mayor of Asheville and UNC Charlotte alumna, will deliver the third annual Bertha Maxwell-Roddey Distinguished Africana Lecture at 4:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 30, in the Rowe Arts Building, Room 130.

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Smith discusses 'The Help' on 'Charlotte Talks'

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Debra Smith, Africana studies, appeared on WFAE’s “Charlotte Talks” to discuss fact and fiction in the feature film “The Help.”

Debra Smith, Africana studies, appeared on WFAE’s “Charlotte Talks” to discuss fact and fiction in the feature film “The Help.” Listen to the archived segment.

ā€˜Deepest Woundsā€™ to receive Wallace Award

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“The Deepest Wounds: A Labor and Environmental History of Sugar in Northeast Brazil,” written by Tom Rogers, a faculty member in the Africana Studies Department, will receive the 2011 Henry A. Wallace Award.

“The Deepest Wounds: A Labor and Environmental History of Sugar in Northeast Brazil,” written by Tom Rogers, a faculty member in the Africana Studies Department, will receive the 2011 Henry A. Wallace Award.

The honor, given by the Agricultural History Society, is for the best book written on any aspect of agricultural history outside the United States. It will be presented formally at the society’s annual banquet in June in Springfield, Ill.

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deepest wounds
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